Quote Of The Moment

While my quotes thus fasr have been primarily skeptical or science based, I ran across this a while back, and felt that it was just “too good” to pass up for the blog.

Why are gas prices so high? Let me get this right–we invade countries with shitloads of oil, and gas prices skyrocket??? I’ll tell you this: if I invade IHOP, pancakes are gonna be cheap as shit in my house.

Chris Rock

About Jeff Randall

Jeff Randall is a frequent volunteer for free-thought organizations, including the Center For Inquiry – DC. Having been blogging since January 2008, he decided that a community of bloggers would be an interesting new experience (or at the very least a fun way to annoy his friends into reading his posts more frequently). Since finding out about about the existence of, and then joining, the atheist/skeptic community in 2007 he has been committed to community activism, critical thinking in all aspects of life, science, reason, and a fostering a secular society.
This entry was posted in Humor, Politics, Quotes. Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to Quote Of The Moment

  1. Pingback: Quote of the moment | Rodibidably

  2. gas prices ought to be $10 thousand per milligram.

    (not really my website)

    • Jeff Randall says:

      Well that price might be a tad excessive, but it’s a reasonable idea that by raising gas prices now while we still have it as a resource, we are pushing more research and development into renewable resources by making them more cost effective by comparison.

      • Fossil fuel industry needs to be ended far before the resource runs out. All remaining fossil fuel reserves must be left where it is in the ground. The price for burning a microgram of fossil fuel ought to be the death penalty.
        James Hansen, Director, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies; & adjunct professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University,
        *Storms of My Grandchildren*
        “After the ice is gone, would Earth proceed to the Venus syndrome, a runaway greenhouse effect that would destroy all life on the planet, perhaps permanently? While that is difficult to say based on present information, I’ve come to conclude that if we burn all reserves of oil, gas, and coal, there is a substantial chance we will initiate the runaway greenhouse. If we also burn the tar sands and tar shale, I believe the Venus syndrome is a dead certainty.”

        http://www.sindark.com/2010/02/04/is-runaway-climate-change-possible-hansens-take/

        tipping point of no return is Dec of 2016,
        Andrew Simms

        http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/series/100monthstosavetheworld

      • Jeff Randall says:

        “The price for burning a microgram of fossil fuel ought to be the death penalty.”

        Even if I was not opposed to the death penalty, this seems as if it might be a tad excessive…

  3. Jeffrey Hyman says:

    If we don’t end fossil fuel industry, then all of existence gets the death penalty.

    • Jeff Randall says:

      I agree we need to get off of fossil fuels and on to renewable energy… HOWEVER, I think we need to find realistic solutions (and killing people for using oil is not exactly realistic)…

      We need a large push of nuclear while we rebuild the grid and setup all of the solar, wind, geothermal, and other power generation utilities we’ll need to sustain the world’s population’s needs…

  4. Jeffrey Hyman says:

    How about a tax on carbon that starts at what ever rate it would take to motivate people to reduce by 2%. Then increase the rate every year to reduce use by another 2% every year so that the industry is ended in 50 years time. fair enough?
    I’d use the revenue to 1st pay off the govt debts, and the rest to temporarily reduce income tax.
    After fossil fuel industry is ended. How do we keep it from coming back to life, if not by excessively harsh penalty. Criminalization hasn’t ended the illegal drugs industry.
    Actually, in 50 years, maybe cataclysmic collapse will have already started, so we won’t have capacity for further fossil fuel industry, if we’re lucky. no, …

    • Jeff Randall says:

      How about a tax on carbon that starts at what ever rate it would take to motivate people to reduce by 2%. Then increase the rate every year to reduce use by another 2% every year so that the industry is ended in 50 years time. fair enough?

      I won’t speak to the specific numbers (2% and 50 years), but the general idea is exactly what I think needs to be done…

      I’d use the revenue to 1st pay off the govt debts, and the rest to temporarily reduce income tax.

      I’d put the money into research on renewable energy resources and updating the power grid first. Then universal health care. THEN pay down the debt. and a VERY VERY distant last would be to reduce taxes.

      After fossil fuel industry is ended. How do we keep it from coming back to life, if not by excessively harsh penalty. Criminalization hasn’t ended the illegal drugs industry.

      We make renewable resources cheaper than oil. Then oil would never return.

      Actually, in 50 years, maybe cataclysmic collapse will have already started, so we won’t have capacity for further fossil fuel industry, if we’re lucky. no, …

      Let’s hope not…

  5. Jeffrey Hyman says:

    When all realistic solutions lead to the end of humanity, it’s time to be unrealistic.

    • Jeff Randall says:

      Unrealistic solutions won’t be taken seriously by those in power, and only make the side arguing for change look foolish…

      • Jeffrey Hyman says:

        If unrealistic solutions won’t be taken seriously, then all life on earth gets incinerated. You may be right that it’s unrealistic, but it doesn’t mean we should give up. And being realistic is giving up.

      • Jeff Randall says:

        I disagree that being realistic is giving up. Workings towards real solutions may not be as idealistic as pie in the sky ideas, but it’s much more likely to make an actual impact.

      • Jeffrey Hyman says:

        Realistic solutions are those proposed by politicians well liked enough to get themselves elected, or those supported by significant populations of voters. Realistic solutions are those that may be likely to happen. Real solutions are those that are likely to work. I tried this analogy on you before. We’re in this vehicle, accelerating towards a cliff. Among *realistic* solutions, one extreme wants increased acceleration, the other extreme wants also to continue foreword acceleration but just a little less. The only *real* solution which ends with not everyone dead is to hit the breaks, decelerate, stop, and reverse; unrealistic. The impact of the realistic solution is zero; everyone ends up dead. The only realistic solutions are non-solutions, and the only real solutions are unrealistic.

      • Jeff Randall says:

        Realistic solutions are those proposed by politicians well liked enough to get themselves elected, or those supported by significant populations of voters.

        No. Realistic solutions are one that have a realistic chance of actually being implemented.

        Realistic solutions are those that may be likely to happen. Real solutions are those that are likely to work.

        If a solution is never implemented, it’s got a 0% chance of working… I’d rather have something with a 50% chance of working implemented, over something with a 100& change of working that never gets started…

        I tried this analogy on you before. We’re in this vehicle, accelerating towards a cliff. Among *realistic* solutions, one extreme wants increased acceleration, the other extreme wants also to continue foreword acceleration but just a little less. The only *real* solution which ends with not everyone dead is to hit the breaks, decelerate, stop, and reverse; unrealistic. The impact of the realistic solution is zero; everyone ends up dead. The only realistic solutions are non-solutions, and the only real solutions are unrealistic.

        The thing about analogies is that they are very simplistic, and easy to manipulate.
        Let’s take yours for instance. A car going towards a cliff. One group wants to keep going as if there is no cliff. And here is where your analogy fails. Instead of group 2 wanting to continue but slow down a little, group 2 actually wants to stop. The option you are proposing would be instead trying to throw the car into reverse which would drop the transmission out of the car, destroying the car in the process.

      • Jeffrey Hyman says:

        You could support more than one plan as superior to status quo; not make perfect enemy of the good. but it’s important to stress that a plan with 90% chance of working is superior to plan with 10% chance of working. With existence at stake, 10% is unacceptable when 90% is possible. If you oppose a plan with higher probability of working if implemented because you think its unlikely to be supported by others then you’re responsible for making it less likely.
        The probability of a plan being implemented increases as people with power or influence are persuaded to support it and act to persuade others.
        Maximize: (probability of working if implemented)*(probability of implementation if supported)

      • Jeff Randall says:

        gas prices ought to be $10 thousand per milligram.

        Not realistic

        All remaining fossil fuel reserves must be left where it is in the ground. The price for burning a microgram of fossil fuel ought to be the death penalty.

        Not realistic

        How about a tax on carbon that starts at what ever rate it would take to motivate people to reduce by 2%. Then increase the rate every year to reduce use by another 2% every year so that the industry is ended in 50 years time. fair enough?

        Realistic…

  6. The basis of major financial decisions on investments comes from our political leadership. We all know how this enterprise is currently fairing.

    In our system of operations we have circumvented what is good for Homo Faber for the Tyrannosaurus Corporatus Rex Sapiens…and our watchdog, the Press has failed to meet their commitment for the same reasons: Corporate greed not only controls the financial pursestrings, but also any attempt to change this status quo.
    Address what we know is the problem to continued human existence, for whatever the reason, and we will solve not only peak oil, but fresh water shortage, nuclear energy and so many other maladies, which if not corrected very soon, will result in an untimely evolution of our planet- and his species.
    In a finite system uncontrolled growth is unsustainable. Think.

    • Jeff Randall says:

      A very lengthy reply to a quote from a comedian that was meant to get a laugh…

      I do agree that corporate greed has led to many problems in our government, but I also think at a very simplistic level, the point made in this joke is valid…

    • Jeffrey Hyman says:

      What is Quentin’s alternative to corporate greed? How would it work? I’m not liking the concept of “corporate personhood” but more generally there’s lot’s of good reason for freedom in markets.
      Fossil fuel industries need to be ended immediately as fossil carbon is killing the planet. Nuclear power is not a malady. It’s carbon free; has much greater energy capacity then any other carbon-free alternative; without nuclear, the odds of ending fossil fuel industry in time to save existence is orders of magnitude less – it won’t happen without it. I’d rather live with increased rates of cancers then not live at all. Coal killed many times more then nuclear ever has.

      http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2988/is-nuclear-power-safe

      (oh, April1 this article, well, I don’t believe it it was meant as a joke)

  7. oh, it was a JOKE! Can I laugh, even if it really is so serious…..

  8. Jeffrey Hyman says:

    Chris rock and everyone else complaining about too high gas prices keep real solutions unrealistic; less pandering politicians give stupid voters every stupid thing they ask for.

    it’s a good quote; I like Chris Rock.

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